Minions

Monday, March 7, 2011

Teach Yourself Programming... in Ten Years


Iv been programming for roughly a year now, mainly in Java, Flash´s Actionscipt 3 and c#. I thought was getting the hang of it and freaked out totally when I found a post made by Peter Norvig. He claims that it takes 10 years (or 10.000) hours to become a good programmer.
In his post (http://norvig.com/21-days.html), he analyzes books like “Learn Java in 7 days” and ‘proves’ that knowing the syntax of a language doesn’t automatically make you a good programmer. He also gives a few useful tips, on how to start programming and follow through with it.. for 10 years.
Interesting if you are, or want to become a programmer.

18 comments:

  1. Havent got that much time dude :D

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  2. ...any chance of 9 if I worked REALLY hard?

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  3. Ten years seems like an overestimate

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  4. @ torrentwatch
    ok, for you ill make an exeption^^

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  5. Thanks for the link mate, Bren looking for a good online guide for java! Cheers

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  6. I don't have the patience for such things. I couldn't even do that for 5 years.

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  7. Hmmm I know that so far in school I have taken multiple years of programming and I STILL don't feel proficient.

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  8. The 10,000 hour theory has been around for a while. I heard about it in a book by Malcolm Gladwell. He says it takes that much practice to be truly an expert at anything.

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  9. I think I'm 5 years to old to learn to program now :S

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  10. It requires a lot of work like most things in life

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  11. That does seem like an over estimate. After 10 years, whatever language you are programing will be outdated anyway.

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  12. Well I dont think that it takes 10 years, but yes, it takes a lot to become a GOOD programmer.

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  13. programming comes down to continually learning the next language. You will never be done "Learning" Programming. At least until we can make computers think for us.

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  14. There's a difference between "good" as it's being defined here and "able to muddle one's way through to accomplish a necessary task." The latter is usually fine, the former comes eventually. no big deal.

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